EAMC’s New Spencer Cancer Center Opens

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The E.L. Spencer, Jr. and Ruth Priester Spencer Cancer Center at EAMC will welcome patients beginning Monday, June 17. The modern facility is more than 59,000 square feet in size and offers advanced treatments and new services.

“For the majority of cancer types and majority of cancer cases – other than the rare, specialty – anything can be treated here,” EAMC President and CEO Laura Grill says. “When you’re under cancer care, you want to stay at home and you want to stay in your community.”

“Our cancer cases have increased over the past five to seven years as the area has grown, and we simply outgrew our old cancer center,” John Cabelka, M.D., Spencer Cancer Center radiation oncologist, said during a media tour in early June. “We had a great team of skilled personnel, but the facilities were older and too small.”
The New Center

“We don’t just treat Auburn and Opelika patients—we treat all the surrounding counties,” EAMC Vice President of Clinical Services Chris Clark says. “We wanted to provide a facility that allows patients to stay home, get the best in cancer care and provide all the services you think they might need in a facility. It’s all from the viewpoint of the patient.”

Amenities at the new center include 28 infusion chairs in five bays, 10 infusion center extension chairs, a spacious boutique with a wide selection of bras, wigs and other prosthetic items, an outpatient pharmacy, two linear accelerators, 18 examination rooms, a PET/CT machine, physician offices, a chapel, four conference and education rooms, a resource library and more.

Located on 15.66 acres of land on Village Professional Drive in Opelika, the new center is beautifully designed to take advantage of the hill and landscape of the property. Large windows and tall ceilings help make the area feel spacious and bright. The windows also provide views of the landscaping and wooded area surrounding the structure.

“My hope is that someday, when I looked at this center when it was being made, we can turn this into a preventative healthcare facility or a wellness center after we find a cure for cancer,” Dr. Cabelka says. “But unfortunately, I think we are going to have cancer here for at least a couple of generations. If we can’t cure it, we can turn it into a chronic disease.”
For more information, call 334-528-1070 or visit www.eamc.org.